Adblocking: How About Nah? (Excerpt from EFF)

For more than a decade, consumer rights groups (including EFF) worked with technologists and companies to try to standardize Do Not Track, a flag that browsers could send to online companies signaling that their users did not want their browsing activity tracked.

Adblocking: How About Nah? (Excerpt from EFF)
Adblocking: How About Nah? (Excerpt from EFF)

By Cory Doctorow

For more than a decade, consumer rights groups (including EFF) worked with technologists and companies to try to standardize Do Not Track, a flag that browsers could send to online companies signaling that their users did not want their browsing activity tracked. Despite long hours and backing from the FTC, foot-dragging from the browser vendors and outright hostility from the big online media companies mean that setting Do Not Track in your browser does virtually nothing to protect your privacy.

do not track

Do Not Track grew out of widespread public concern over invasive "behavioral advertising" that relied on tracking to target ads; despite a generation of promises from the ad industry that consumers would welcome more relevant advertising, the consistent result has been that users are freaked out by "relevant" ads because they understand that relevancy is synonymous with privacy invasion. Nothing is so creepy as ads for a product you looked into earlier following you from site to site, then from app to app, as you are tracked and retargeted by a desperate vendor's algorithm.

Editor's Note: We liked this article not only because of its privacy advice, but because intrusive advertising is becoming more of an annoyance. We recommend you check out EFF's other content as well.

Full Original Post: Adblocking: How About Nah? | Electronic Frontier Foundation